Welcome to REMEMBER

Experience in a special way different aspects of the history of the Berlin Charité during the era of National Socialism. The REMEMBER app accompanies you on your journey through the Campus Charité Mitte in Berlin. The app leads you to six memorial sculptures and opens up artistic perspectives on this dark episode of history.

REMEMBER is the art project of the artists Sharon Paz, Jürgen Salzmann, and Karl-Heinz Stenz and was selected as the winner of the competition “Memory Path”, GeDenkOrt.Charité – Science and Social Responsibility.

“We want to emphasize respect for every human life and to initiate reflection on our own behavior.”

As an interactive memorial, REMEMBER brings traces of this past into the present. It connects current technologies with contemporary art and thus allows previously silent sites of remembrance to speak.

The central starting points are the memorial sculptures located at six historical sites on campus. The memory path includes a free app for smartphones and tablets that features interactive video art at each of the sculptures. Two fictional characters, a nurse and a caretaker, accompany visitors through the memory path and invite them to experience brief travels in time.

Through the combination of different elements, the memorial sculptures, video art, and the original environment, REMEMBER creates a living remembrance.

THE CHARITÉ

The Charité is one of the most modern university clinics in Europe: here education, treatment, and research are closely intertwined. The Charité was founded in 1727 as a Berlin civil hospital, and its name was understood as a mandate: Charité meaning mercy and compassion.

“During National Socialism, German physicians – including doctors at the Charité – participated in cruel deeds through the practice of their vocation.”

Professor Dr. Karl Max Einhäupl, Chairman of the Board of the Charité, 2015

But there were also times when medical knowledge was employed for political purposes. During the reign of the National Socialists, doctors at the Charité were among those who supported the goals of the National Socialism regime and even committed crimes against people of all ages by participating actively inhuman practices focused on race, performance, and extermination.

Against the background of these National Socialism crimes, the explicit goal of the memorial work at the Charité is to take responsibility for the consequences of this time and to enable an ongoing dialogue about responsibility in medicine and science that is not limited to the past but that also encompasses the present and the future.

THE MEMORIAL SCULPTURES

Six different memorial sculptures are located on the memory path. These sculptures – flat, vertical steles – are two meters high and sixty centimeters wide. They protrude directly from the ground and are made of corten steel, which over time will develop particularly lively hues in its protective rust layer. The upper section is designed in the shape of a barcode that has been cut into the steel and spells out “REMEMBER.”

“The size of the sculptures reminds the size of a person. This ‘person’ appears to be lost and unprotected in his environment. The sculpture will change in color and structure over time, because of the changing seasons. In strong winds, it will move a bit. The sculptures shoot out directly from the ground and sometimes evoke a guillotine or a prison bars.”

A special font was chosen for the name of the stations: the “Schwabacher,” which was defamed and forbidden as “Schwabacher Jewish letters” in the Normal Script Ordinance of 1941. The font has its origins in the Nuremberg region of the 15th century and was disseminated in Germany primarily through the Lutheran Bible and its reprints. It was later so commonly used for emphasis in Fraktur texts that to add any textual accentuation was referred to as “schwabaching.” Why the font was suddenly referred to as “Jewish letters” remains a secret of the Nazis.

At the center of each sculpture is the engraving of a representative object: glasses, a syringe, a head-measuring instrument, a microscope, forceps, and a bone saw. The originals are located in the nearby Berlin Medical History Museum of the Charité.

Locations

Ausstellung - GeDenkOrt.Charité
Bonhoefferweg 3,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Psychiatry and Neurology
Bonhoefferweg 3,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Gynecology
Virchowweg 20,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Teaching and Learning
Virchowweg 22,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Anatomy
Philippstraße 12,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10115 Berlin

Pediatrics
Charitéplatz 2,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Persecuted Science
Virchowweg 6,
Campus Charité Mitte
D - 10117 Berlin

Other Locations?